• http://www.blogger.com/profile/15604275098987748466 steckarrr
    Hi! Just discovered your blog and I've really enjoyed reading it so far. Do you think the recent $50 million grant from the World Bank to ensure transparency in the mineral trade in DRC will make a difference? [http://www.africanmanager.com/site_eng/detail_article.php?art_id=15239]
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10648727700659999180 Schuyler Null
    Thanks for your comment steckarrr. According to the World Bank, a central aim of the grant is to help the DRC move towards full compliance with the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (EITI). The trouble with EITI in the DRC’s case, as mentioned above, is that it does little to immediately address violence in the country, which is the result we're all looking for. That being said, every little bit counts and joining EITI and other transparency initiatives will certainly be important moving forward.

    For more info on EITI in conflict countries, see our interview with Jill Shankleman on Afghanistan.
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10648727700659999180 Schuyler Null
    Update: The Washington Post reports the Financial Reform Bill with the resource transparency provision has passed the Senate:

    "The legislation requires companies doing business in Congo and neighboring countries to disclose the origin of any minerals they trade in as specifically as possible. The requirement applies to any company listed on a U.S. stock exchange.

    The legislation specifies four minerals believed to be funding the conflict, including gold and tin ore. It would give the U.S. secretary of state the ability to expand the list."
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10648727700659999180 Schuyler Null
    Update: The Hill reports the White House will push other countries to adopt similar transparency rules.

    Some industry groups fear the law may give a competitive advantage to state-owned firms in Russia and China.
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10648727700659999180 Schuyler Null
    Update: Outrage justifiably grows over UN's failure to prevent the systematic rape of almost 200 women only 20 km from a forward base in the Eastern DRC by Rwandan and Mai Mai rebels.

    The UN mission is not only ineffective at the moment but is actually set to withdraw within a year's time. Securing resources is part of the solution but when will the international community start focusing on seriously improving human security as well?
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/15604275098987748466 steckarrr
    I have heard that the removal of MONUSCO troops will not be in Eastern DRC, but other regions where the situation is more stable. Maybe I am mistaken?
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10648727700659999180 Schuyler Null
    Hi steckarrr, under MONUSCO's current mandate, they are only to deploy until June 30, 2011 and focus mainly in Eastern DRC. (Although there are caveats that the Security Council may invoke, like lack of stability, etc.).

    2,000 troops were withdrawn earlier this summer from other parts of the country.
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10648727700659999180 Schuyler Null
    Update: DRC President Joseph Kabila bans mining in Eastern provinces, reports the AP. Of course illegal mining has been an issue for quite some time with the army also benefiting, so it remains to be seen how this will be enforced.
  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/10648727700659999180 Schuyler Null
    Last but critical update: Bloomberg reports Apple and Intel took efforts to block minerals orginating from the eastern Congo from entering their supply chains this month, and the SEC is expected to issue their regulations governing the implementation of the conflict minerals amendment of the Dodd-Frank act.

    A big deal, but Bloomberg also points out that DRC dealers are already looking to offset the move by shifting to Asian buyers, where demand is rapidly growing.
Mobile Theme